The Journal of Law, Environment and Development (LEAD) is a peer-reviewed journal which publishes articles, case notes and documents of interest to professionals, practitioners, researchers, students and policy-makers in the field of international and regional environmental law and domestic environmental laws of developing countries. It emphasises a comparative approach to the study of environmental law and is the only journal in the field to carry a North-South focus. It is unique in providing perspectives from both developed and developing countries. Bearing in mind the principles of 'sustainable development', LEAD also solicits writings which incorporate related concerns, such as human rights and trade, in the study of environmental management, thus adopting a contextual approach to the examination of environmental issues. LEAD encourages scholarship which combine theoretical and practical approaches to the study of environmental law and practice. rolex replica swiss rolex fake omega watches

LEAD is indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, EBSCO, Heinonline, Manupatra, Genamics JournalSeek, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS) and Open J-Gate.

 


Most environmental problems are transboundary in nature with one State's policies and practices often resulting in environmental change elsewhere. Individual environmental regimes - local, national, regional or international - cannot be studied in isolation from one another. LEAD seeks to fill the need for a comparative approach to environmental law. LEAD is the only journal to adopt such a comparative perspective on environmental law issues from a North-South perspective. Its timely and incisive analysis of the experiences of different countries and of the interplay between different environmental regimes aids the development of more beneficial and fitting environmental approaches and procedures at both international and national level. In keeping with its comparative focus it regularly publishes important environmental legislations and documents from regional and national bodies.

Further, LEAD is the only international law journal to provide a forum for analysis of environmental regimes in developing countries and for examination of North-South dimensions in the development and implementation of environmental law. It will provide perspectives from both developed and developing countries.

Bearing in mind the principles of 'sustainable development', LEAD solicits writings which incorporate related concerns, such as human rights and trade, in the study of environmental management, thus adopting a contextual approach to the examination of environmental issues. LEAD is pioneering in its attempt to lay equal emphasis on both theoretical and practical approaches to the study of environmental law and practice.

LEAD is designed for both academics and practitioners and has a wide circulation in both the developed and developing world. It is an invaluable resource for researchers, policy-makers, lawyers, judges, NGOs and students interested in:

  • information on environmental law, policy and practice at local, national, regional and international levels;

  • analysis of the development and implementation of environmental law at these levels;

  • examining the linkages between environmental problems and other global issues.


The journal specifically seeks to foster scholarship in following areas:

  • Comparative approaches to the study of international environmental law, with a special emphasis on North-South issues.

  • Regional environmental law regimes among developing countries.

  • Implementation of international environmental law at regional and national levels.

  • Influence of international environmental law on national and regional environmental law regimes, and cross-fertilisation.

  • Cross-sectoral analysis in the study of environmental law, especially study of the relationship between environment and trade, property rights, intellectual property and human rights.

LEAD comprises commissioned as well as unsolicited articles by leading academics and practitioners in the fields of international and environmental law, selected national and regional documents, case notes. It is published biannually and on occasion brings out thematic issues.

 
   
 
 

Our ethic statements are based on LEAD’s editorial policies and COPE's Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors.


I. Publication Decisions

The editor of LEAD journal is responsible for deciding which of the articles submitted to the journal should be published. The editor may be guided by the policies of the journal’s editorial board and constrained by such legal requirements as shall then be in force regarding libel, copyright infringement and plagiarism. The editor may confer with other editors or reviewers in making this decision.

1. Fair Play

An editor will at any time evaluate manuscripts for their intellectual content without regard to race, gender, sexual orientation, religious belief, ethnic origin, citizenship, or political philosophy of the authors.

2. Confidentiality

The editor and any editorial staff must not disclose any information about a submitted manuscript to anyone other than the corresponding author, reviewers, potential reviewers, other editorial advisers, and the publisher, as appropriate.

3. Disclosure and Conflicts of Interest

Unpublished materials disclosed in a submitted manuscript must not be used in an editor’s own research without the express written consent of the author.

Privileged information or ideas obtained through peer review must be kept confidential and not used for personal advantage.

Editors should excuse themselves (namely should ask a co-editor, associate editor or other member of the editorial board instead to review and consider) from considering manuscripts in which they have conflicts of interest resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relationships or connections with any of the authors, companies, or (possibly) institutions connected to the papers.

Editors should require all contributors to disclose relevant competing interests and publish corrections if competing interests are revealed after publication. If needed, other appropriate action should be taken, such as the publication of a retraction or expression of concern.

Note: A conflict of interest is construed as a personal involvement in a case or other matter being reported; a meaningful financial interest in the matter, or a connection with an author, including personal relationships or direct academic competition, that might raise the question of bias in reviewing and judging work submitted for publication.

II. Duties of Reviewers

1. Contribution to Editorial Decisions

Peer review assists the editor in making editorial decisions and through the editorial communications with the author may also assist the author in improving the paper. Peer review is an essential component of formal scholarly communication and lies at the heart of the scientific method.

2. Promptness

Any selected referee who feels unqualified to review the research reported in a manuscript or knows that they will not be able to offer a prompt review should notify the editor and excuse herself/himself from the review process.

3. Confidentiality

Any manuscripts received for review must be treated as confidential documents. They must not be shown to or discussed with others except as authorized by the editor.

4. Standards of Objectivity

Reviews should be conducted objectively. Personal criticism of the author is inappropriate. Referees should express their views clearly with supporting arguments.

5. Acknowledgement of Sources

Reviewers should identify relevant published work that has not been cited by the authors. Any statement that an observation, derivation, or argument had been previously reported should be accompanied by the relevant citation. A reviewer should also call to the editor’s attention any substantial similarity or overlap between the manuscript under consideration and any other published paper of which they have personal knowledge.

6. Disclosure and Conflict of Interest

Privileged information or ideas obtained through peer review must be kept confidential and not used for personal advantage. Reviewers should not consider manuscripts in which they have conflicts of interest resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relationships or connections with any of the authors, companies, or institutions connected to the papers.

7. Grievance Redressal and Co-operation in Investigation

An editor should take reasonably responsive measures when ethical complaints have been presented concerning a submitted manuscript or published paper, in conjunction with the publisher. Such measures will generally include contacting the author of the manuscript or paper and giving due consideration of the respective complaint or claims made but may also include further communications to the relevant institutions and research bodies, and if the complaint is upheld, the publication of a correction, retraction, expression of concern, or other note, as may be relevant. Every reported act of unethical publishing behaviour must be looked into, even if it is discovered years after publication.

III. Duties of Authors

1. Reporting Standards

Authors of reports of original research should present an accurate account of the work performed as well as an objective discussion of its significance. Underlying data should be represented accurately in the paper. A paper should contain sufficient detail and references to permit others to replicate the work. Fraudulent or knowingly inaccurate statements constitute unethical behaviour and are unacceptable.

2. Data Access and Retention

Authors are asked to provide the raw data in connection with a paper for editorial review and should be prepared to provide public access to such data, if practicable, and should in any event be prepared to retain such data for a reasonable time after publication.

3. Originality and Plagiarism

The authors should ensure that they have written entirely original works, and if the authors have used the work and/or words of others that this has been appropriately cited or quoted.

4. Multiple, Redundant, or Concurrent Publication

An author should not in general publish manuscripts describing essentially the same research in more than one journal or primary publication. Submitting the same manuscript to more than one journal concurrently constitutes unethical publishing behaviour and is unacceptable.

5. Acknowledgement of Sources

Proper acknowledgment of the work of others must always be given. Authors should cite publications that have been influential in determining the nature of the reported work. Information obtained privately, as in conversation, correspondence, or discussion with third parties, must not be used or reported without explicit, written permission from the source. Information obtained in the course of confidential services, such as refereeing manuscripts or grant applications, must not be used without the explicit written permission of the author of the work involved in these services.

6. Authorship of the Paper

Authorship should be limited to those who have made a significant contribution to the conception, design, execution, or interpretation of the reported study. All those who have made significant contributions should be listed as co-authors. Where there are others who have participated in certain substantive aspects of the research project, they should be acknowledged or listed as contributors. The corresponding author should ensure that all appropriate co-authors and no inappropriate co-authors are included on the paper, and that all co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the paper and have agreed to its submission for publication.

7. Disclosure and Conflicts of Interest

All authors should disclose in their manuscript any financial or other substantive conflict of interest that might be construed to influence the results or interpretation of their manuscript. All sources of financial support for the project should be disclosed. Examples of potential conflicts of interest, which should be disclosed include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/registrations, and grants or other funding. Potential conflicts of interest should be disclosed at the earliest stage possible.

8. Fundamental errors in published works

When an author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in his/her own published work, it is the author's obligation to promptly notify the journal editor and cooperate with the editor to retract or correct the paper. If the editor learns from a third party that a published work contains a significant error, it is the obligation of the author to promptly retract or correct the paper or provide evidence to the editor of the correctness of the original paper.

 

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